Hornpipes

Index of all Hornpipes

An Tri Is A Rian

I learned this hornpipe from the playing of Cormac Begley, who learned it himself from East Clare concertina player Mary MacNamara.

Boys of Bluehill (The)

“The Boys of Bluehill” is one of the most common tune in Irish Music. Some would say it is only a beginner tune, but I think it is a beautiful hornpipe. This is the version we play around Doolin, I think I got it from Terry Bingham. I like playing this tune with flute player Adrian McMahon, he usually plays it after “The Good Natured Man”.

Caisleán an Óir

Caisleán an Óir (The Golden Castle) was composed by Junior Crehan from Miltown Malbay. I learned it from Terry Bingham, who often plays it after “If there weren’t any woman in the world”. It was also recorded on Matt Molloy and Sean Keane’s brilliant album “Contentment is Wealth”.

Chief O’Neill’s Favourite

I learned this hornpipe from Hugh Healy and Sean Vaughan. There are different versions “Chief O’Neill’s Favourite” (with only F# for example), but this is what I think is the most common setting in the area.

Cronin’s Hornpipe

“Cronin’s Hornpipe” is a popular tune that I learned from Terry Bingham. I also associate this tune with my good friend Adrian McMahon, a great flute player from Kilfenora. Adrian likes to play it after “The Rights of Men”, which makes a really nice change.

Flowing Tide (The)

“The Flowing Tide” is a hornpipe that is very much associated with the playing of the legendary Chris Droney, concertina player from Bell Harbour. I actually learned it from Christy Barry, James Devitt and Terry Bingham.

Galway Hornpipe (The)

I learned “The Galway Hornpipe” from Hugh & Colm Healy’s album “Macalla na hÓige”. I always enjoy playing “The Good Natured Man” after it, I think it is a very nice change.

Good Natured Man (The)

I learned “The Good Natured Man” with my friend Gilles Tabary (flute), on one on his visit to Doolin. I have enjoyed playing this hornpipe for many years now and it is still one of my favourites, which I particularly enjoy playing with Adrian McMahon, flute player from Kilfenora.

Her Lovely Hair Was Flowing Down Her Back

“Her Lovely Hair Was Flowing Down Her Back” is a hornpipe I first learned from The Mulcahy Family on their wonderful album “Notes From The Heart”. I came across this tune many times and in different keys, so I transcribed two keys below, Aminor and Bminor. I think it is also played in Gminor sometimes.

Humours Of Tullycrine (The)

“The Humours of Tullycrine” is a wonderful hornpipe and has been one of my favourite tunes for many years. It is quite a common hornpipe in Clare, and I associate it Sean Vaughan in particular. It is often followed by another beautiful hornpipe, “Mickey Callaghan’s Fancy”.

Jim Coleman’s

“Jim Coleman’s Hornpipe” is named after Michael Coleman’s brother who was, as far as I know, a flute player. I heard this tune played by the great banjo player from Doolin, Kevin Griffin, during a session at Gus O’Connor’s Pub. However, I actually learned it later John Wynne’s album “With Every Breath”.

Rights of Man (The)

I learned The rights of Man during my very first summer in Ireland, back in 2006, on the tin whistle. It is my friend Stéphane who got me started, and I am ever so grateful for all the advice and tips he gave me, especially around his respectful approach to traditional music.

Random Tunes

Black Pat’s

“Black Pat’s” is a composition of Tommy Peoples’. He wrote and recorded the tune in F, but this version in G comes from the playing of his daughter Síobhan Peoples, on her duet album “Time on our Hands” with accordion player Murty Ryan.

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An Sean Duine

I learned the jig “An Sean Duine” from my friend in Switzerland Geneviève, who plays the accordion. I think she got it on Mick O’Brien’s CD “The Morning Dew”.

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Gander In The Pratie Hole (The)

“The Gande in the Pratie Hole” is a jig I associate with my friend Tom Delany. I learned it from him during one his visits in Doolin, back in 2011. The band Moher, which features Noel O’Donoghue (flute) and Michael Queally (fiddle) among others also recorded it.

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